Report

If you have experienced any form of harassment, sexual harassment or assault, hate crime, bullying or victimisation, you can find several tools to report it here. If you’re unsure about how you’d define your experience, have a read through each section and see what method of reporting feels right for you.

It is completely your choice to report something that’s happened to you. It can often be a really scary or daunting prospect to report an incident, but there is support available to help you if you decide to. You can find more information about the support available here.

If you are in immediate danger or seriously injured, call 999 to speak to the emergency services. You can also report non-emergency crimes on 101.


Bullying and Harassment

If you’ve experienced unwanted conduct which has the purpose or effect of violating your dignity or which creates an interrogating, degrading, hostile, offensive or humiliating environment.

Report Bullying or Harassment

  • Report to Queen Mary
    There are procedures in place at Queen Mary for students to report under the Student Complaints Policy. You can make a report using the University's Report and Support platform. You can learn more about what happens to reports here. If you are thinking about making a complaint, the Students' Union Academic Advice Service is a free, independent and confidential service that offers advice and advocacy support to all students. They can explain the process of making a complaint and support you to do so.
  • The Police
    You can report to the Police by calling 101.

Sexual Harassment

If you’ve experienced unwanted behaviour of a sexual nature which has the purpose or effect of violating your dignity, makes you feel intimidated, degraded or humiliated or has created a hostile or offensive environment.

Report Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment includes a wide range of behaviour such as:

  • Sexual comments or jokes
  • Physical behaviour, including unwelcome sexual advances, touching and various forms of sexual assault
  • Displaying pictures, photos or drawings of a sexual nature
  • Sending emails with sexual content

Not all of these behaviours are considered a crime, but they are never acceptable. If you feel you cannot say no or ask someone to stop then this is still harassment. Sexual harassment is not caused by what you wear, how you act or where you choose to go out or walk at night. It is always the fault of the person who has chosen to harass you. You do not need to have previously objected to someone’s behaviour in order for it to be considered harassment.

Sexual harassment is a form of unlawful discrimination under the Equality Act 2010. If you’re being treated badly or less favourably because of your reaction to sexual harassment, you may have a claim under the Equality Act, which states that this is also harassment. If you are thinking of reporting sexual harassment, it is recommended that you keep a note of dates and times of each incident, details of what happened and what was said. If a harasser has touched you, this is sexual or indecent assault and you can report them to the Police if you want to.

  • Report to Queen Mary
    There are procedures in place at Queen Mary for students to report under the Student Complaints Policy. You can make a report using the University's Report and Support platform. You can learn more about what happens to reports here. If you are thinking about making a complaint, the Students' Union Academic Advice Service is a free, independent and confidential service that offers advice and advocacy support to all students. They can explain the process of making a complaint and support you to do so.
  • The Police
    Some forms of sexual harassment are illegal and you can report them to the Police if you want to. You can do so by calling 101 or 999 if you’re in immediate danger.

Sexual Assault, Violence and Rape

If you’ve experienced any act of physical, psychological or emotional violation in the form of a sexual act inflicted on you without your consent. This could involve forcing or manipulating you to witness or participate in any sexual acts.

Report Sexual Assault or Rape

A person consents to sex if they freely agree to sexual intercourse by choice and have the freedom and capacity to make that choice. Sex is non-consensual if you didn't freely agree to it. This includes if you were subject to coercion, if violence or threats of violence were made against you or someone else, if you were asleep, unconscious, under the influence of drugs or alcohol or your disability meant you were not able to communicate your lack of consent.

Everyone has the right to say 'no' to sex and to withdraw or withhold their consent for any sexual act, on any occasion and under any circumstances, regardless of whether they've consented to sex with that person in the past and regardless of whether they're in a relationship with the other person. All forms of sex without consent are classified as rape or sexual assault. Both rape and sexual assault are criminal offences that can be committed by people of all genders.

It is not an easy decision to report rape or sexual assault, and you may wish to seek specialist advice before making a decision about approaching the Police. It is possible to check with your local police station to see if they have a specialist worker – ask to speak to a specially trained Sexual Offences Liaison Officer.

  • The Police
    You can report rape and sexual assault to the Police. If you need urgent medical care or attention, call 999 and ask for an ambulance. Forensic evidence can be collected within 72 hours of the assault. To preserve evidence, if possible try not to wash, brush your teeth, have a cigarette, eat or drink, change your clothes. If you do change your clothes, do not wash them but keep them in a clean plastic bag. Try to avoid going to the toilet and do not clear up anything from the area of the incident.

    You do not need to make a Police report in order to have a forensic medical examination. The Havens will provide this service without you having to make a decision about whether to report to the Police. There is no obligation to make a Police report.
  • Report to Queen Mary
    Queen Mary cannot investigate whether or not a rape or sexual assault took place, however they may carry out an investigation to determine whether there has been a breach of the Code of Student Discipline.

    There are procedures in place at Queen Mary for students to report under the Student Complaints Policy. You can make a report using the University's Report and Support platform. You can learn more about what happens to reports here. If you are thinking about making a complaint, the Students' Union Academic Advice Service is a free, independent and confidential service that offers advice and advocacy support to all students. They can explain the process of making a complaint and support you to do so.


Hate Crime

If you’ve experienced criminal behaviour where the perpetrator is motivated by hostility or demonstrates hostility towards you based on your identity or perceived identity.

Report a hate crime

If you’ve experienced a hate crime, this could include an act of violence or hostility because of who you are or someone thinks you are. This could include prejudice or hostility based upon your race, disability, religion, sexual orientation or gender identity.

You can find more information on what is considered to be a hate crime or hate incident on the Citizens Advice website here.

  • The Police
    You can report a hate crime directly to the police by visiting your local police station or by phone. When reporting, you should ask for the incident reference number, and this will help you in any further dealings with the police. If you don’t wish to report the incident, you can ask someone else (eg. a friend or relative) to report on your behalf, or your local Citizens Advice.
  • Stop Hate UK
    Stop Hate UK has a 24-hour dedicated helpline for anyone affected by hate incidents or hate crime that works or studies at Queen Mary. This includes victims of hate crime, witnesses or anyone who is a third party to an incident that could be a hate crime. The service is available to you whether on campus, at home or out in the community. You can find information about the helpline on Stop Hate UK's website.

Discrimination

If you’ve been treated unfairly because of your identity or perceived identity. This includes your age, disability, transgender identity, marriage or civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or beliefs, sex or sexual orientation.

Report Discrimination

Discrimination means being treated unfairly because of who you are. The Equality Act 2010 protects people from discrimination by placing duties on certain organisations. There are 9 protected characteristics covered by the Equality Act. These are age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage or civil partnership, and, in employment only, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion and beliefs, sex or sexual orientation. Discrimination on the basis of one or more of these characteristics is unlawful under the Act.

This affects the following types of organisations:

  • Employers
  • Schools, colleges, universities and other education providers
  • Businesses and organisations which provide goods or services like banks, shops and utility companies
  • Health and care providers like hospitals and care homes
  • Someone you rent or buy a property from, including housing associations and estate agents
  • Transport services including buses, trains and taxis
  • Public bodies like local authorities and government departments.
  • Report to Queen Mary
    There are procedures in place at Queen Mary for students to report under the Student Complaints Policy. You can make a report using the University's Report and Support platform. You can learn more about what happens to reports here. If you are thinking about making a complaint, the Students' Union Academic Advice Service is a free, independent and confidential service that offers advice and advocacy support to all students. They can explain the process of making a complaint and can support you to do so.

Online abuse

If you have experienced any form of abusive behaviour online, such as sexual violence, harassment, domestic abuse, bullying or hate crime. Online abuse can include things such as sharing explicit images of you or someone else without their consent, or someone sending you explicit, abusive, harassing or otherwise unwanted messages.

Support if you've experienced online abuse

Online abuse refers to any form of violence or abuse perpetrated online. It is not a legal term and it may include many different types of behaviour, such as sexual violence, harassment, bullying or hate crime that occur through online platforms and in online spaces. In some cases, it may be illegal. It is always wrong. To learn more about online abuse and the law, you can view this guide.

If you have experienced a form of online abuse, you can report what has happened to you using the services listed elsewhere on this page.